Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Gwynedd’

Should I Be Concerned About Hard Water?

Tuesday, May 21st, 2013

Do you have an off-white buildup of gunk around your faucets or sink drains? Does your water taste like it has high mineral content? If so, you may have hard water in your home. Hard water affects the majority of homes in America, and if you have it in your home, your plumbing may be at risk of damage. While hard water is not typically hazardous to your health, it is can affect the extensive network of piping that runs through your home. In this post, we’d like to examine in more detail what hard water is and whether you should be concerned about it. If you’re in need of a water treatment system in Chalfont, PA, call Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling today!

First, let’s explain what hard water actually is. Hard water is so called because of its high mineral content. As the water moves through the ground before it is picked up by your water supply source, it can pick up various types of minerals, as well as contaminants. As a good solvent, water is quick to pick up impurities from various other materials. Hard water is mainly caused by high levels of calcium and magnesium in addition to other trace minerals. The higher level of minerals dissolved in the water, the “harder” it becomes.

While hard water in and of itself is not often considered to be a health hazard, it can negatively impact your plumbing. As hard water moves through your piping, it leaves behind mineral deposits called “scale” and these deposits often have a white or green color. As they build up inside your pipes, they actually begin to restrict the flow of water. The rate at which your piping is affected is determined by the level of mineral content. But the consequences of hard water can be dire. It can result in whole house repiping if it’s not caught early.

Fortunately, there are numerous water treatment systems available for installation that can eliminate the hardness of your water, from water softeners, reverse osmosis, and various types of filtration. For a more information about water treatment systems in Chalfont, PA, call Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling today!

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What Does the EPA Do for Indoor Air Quality?

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

There are a number of agencies in the United States dedicated to protecting the health and wellbeing of citizens. What does that mean for you in Gwynedd? It means many of the rules and regulations related to indoor air quality are directly overseen by the EPA and the US government. For a better idea of how this impacts your currently lifestyle, here’s a quick look at what the EPA does.

Formation

The Environmental Protection Agency was formed in 1970 by Richard Nixon and the US Congress to oversee the regulation and oversight of air, water, land and hazardous waste. In short, the EPA works to keep our environment clean and safe.

The EPA and Homeowners

While much of what the EPA does relates to corporate pollution, regulations for manufacturing and consumer products, and development of safe methods of production for things like oil, food and water, the EPA has a big hand in ensuring your home stays safe.

Specifically, the EPA started and oversees the Energy Star program to help consumers purchase appliances and HVAC systems that use the least possible energy. Additionally, the EPA oversees the measurements and minimum requirements for home insulation and ventilation. This has as direct impact on indoor air quality.

Current EPA regulations are based on the ASHRAE Standards for low rise buildings and has been revised in the last two decades to ensure proper ventilation and insulation to reduce energy waste and maintain clean, fresh air.

The clean air act has a big impact on how homes are ventilated and maintained and the EPA does a lot of public service work to educate the public on ways to stay safe, including a recent campaign to get your home tested for radon – a potentially life threatening gas that can exist in any home, regardless of age.

Getting to Know the EPA

If you have an indoor air quality or suspect there may be issues in your home, one of the best resources on the Internet is the EPA’s indoor air quality website. It contains laws and regulations that impact your home (if you plan on remodeling or adding on to your home) and dozens of resources for testing and understanding the levels of pollutants in your home.

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Space Heating vs. an Upgrade to Your Heating System

Monday, March 7th, 2011

If your heating system isn’t really cutting it anymore, it may be time to take a step back and consider what your options are. After all, upgrading to an entirely new heating system is a big investment and a large project that will likely disrupt your life at least for a short period of time. However, under certain circumstances it’s the best alternative out there.

One option to consider when you’re unhappy with your home heating situation is supplementing your central heating system with space heaters. These are generally inexpensive and can be placed virtually anywhere in your house or taken with you from one room to another.

Especially if there is a small part of your home that your heating system just doesn’t seem to reach or that you want to keep a bit warmer than the rest of the house, space heaters can be an excellent option. They’re small, safe and portable and can easily keep a smaller portion of your home or room cozy and warm.

However, you’ll have to take into account the operating costs of a space heater as well as the initial investment when you’re trying to evaluate the overall cost effectiveness of this option. Most space heaters run on electricity, which often costs considerably more than oil or natural gas. If your home heating system runs on electricity anyway, this might not be so much of a factor. But if you have an oil or gas furnace, you could wind up paying significantly more to run space heaters as supplemental heat over time.

Also, it’s worth considering that new home heating systems are likely much more energy efficient than the system you currently have in place. Although the initial installation cost can be pretty substantial, you’ll wind up saving a very large amount on your monthly heating bills by upgrading to a newer model.

Plus, you’ll be getting a system that should be able to satisfactorily heat your home without the need for space heaters or other supplemental heat sources. This translates into a pretty hefty savings over time and that’s something you’ll certainly have to take into consideration when you’re evaluating your options.

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Why Does My Garbage Disposal Leak, Grind Poorly and Make a Lot of Noise?

Monday, February 7th, 2011

It is definitely convenient to have a garbage disposal in your kitchen. They make doing the dishes and getting rid of food waste much easier. But just like any other appliance or piece of equipment in your home, your garbage disposal can sometimes develop a problem that causes it to leak or perform inadequately.

Leaky garbage disposals are certainly no fun to deal with. There are several reasons why garbage disposals can develop a leak. There could be an inadequate amount of putty or sealant at the joint where the garbage disposal connects to the drain pipe from the sink. A leak can also spring from that area simply because the bolts holding the two pieces together are not securely tightened.
The point where food and waste exit the garbage disposal and move into the main drainage system is another spot prone to developing leaks. These types of leaks are similar to those that occur between sink drain and garbage disposal and can be remedied in the same way.

In general, the key to dealing with a garbage disposal leak is to locate the source. This will most often be where two pipes come together or where the pipes join the unit. However, as your garbage disposal ages, it is more prone to developing cracks in the body of the unit itself. When this happens, leaks can develop anywhere there is a seam or break in the body of the garbage disposal itself. With this type of leak, the only thing to do is to replace the garbage disposal with a new one.

Leaks are not the only problems that can develop in a garbage disposal either. Sometimes you may notice that your garbage disposal is making an unusual amount of noise when it is turned on. This is often the result of something getting in there that should not have, so you should not continue to run your garbage disposal. Turn off all power to the unit and see if you can reach or see into the garbage disposal to determine what is causing the problem.

If your garbage disposal is not grinding well even though it seems to be rotating fine, you may not be running enough water into it when it is turned on. The water is necessary to facilitate the grinding process, so be sure to keep it going at all times. If that does not solve the problem, you may need to have a professional come out and take a look at your system to find out what is going on.

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