Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Schwenksville’

How Can a Geothermal System Installation Save Me Energy?

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Every homeowner likes to be comfortable in their own home, no matter how swelteringly hot or bitterly cold the temperature may be outside. With energy prices rising as much as they tend to, though, the cost of keeping your home comfortable year round may dissuade you from doing so. At Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling, we think that that is simply unacceptable. No homeowner should have to sacrifice their comfort to lower energy bills in Buckingham, PA. If high energy costs have got you feeling low contact us today to learn more about geothermal heating and cooling systems.

A geothermal heating and cooling system is one of the most efficient ways in which you can choose to keep your home comfortable all year long. Unlike more conventional heating and air conditioning systems, geothermal heating and cooling systems do not consume fuel in order to keep your home comfortable. Rather, they utilize a geothermal loop system that is buried on your property to absorb existing heat from the ground or a water source. This heat can then be used in your home to warm it in the winter. In the cooling season the process is easily reversed, allowing the geothermal heat pump to remove heat from your home to cool it. Only a very small amount of electricity is used in the process.

Unlike air source heat pumps, a geothermal system does not fall prey to widely fluctuating air temperatures such as those of the air. Because temperatures are much more even and consistent underground or underwater than they are in the open air, a geothermal system can be even more efficient and dependable than standard heat pumps. While the installation of a geothermal system is a bit more involved and expensive than other home comfort system options the potential savings in energy costs over time can help offset the initial investment.

For more information about geothermal heating and cooling system installation services in Buckingham, PA, contact the experts at Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling. We can answer any questions that you may have. You might wind up deciding that this environmentally friendly, highly efficient comfort system option is the right choice for your home heating and cooling needs.

Continue Reading

How Do I Find the Right Size Unit for My Room?

Friday, June 3rd, 2011

When buying an air conditioner, there are a lot of things you need to take into account. One of the most important is the size and power of the unit you choose. Air conditioners come in many different sizes, so if you really want to get the most out of your purchase, you need to do your research and pick one that fits your home like a glove.

Square Feet and BTUs

The best way to determine how large of an air conditioner you need is to match the number of BTUs the unit has to the square footage of the room you want to use it in. That means you need to know what room you’re buying it for before you make your purchase.

The number of BTUs needed goes up proportionately with the room size, so even if you don’t have exact measurements or if your room is oddly shaped, you can get a good idea of how large an air conditioner you need. For instance, a 400 to 550 square foot room is best served by an air conditioner with between 8,000 and 11,000 BTUs, while a room that’s only 250 square feet would probably be fine with a 6,000 BTU unit.

Bigger Isn’t Always Better

One of the most common mistakes people make when buying an air conditioner is to assume that the bigger the unit the better it will work. The truth is that buying an air conditioner that’s too big for your room is just as much of a waste as buying one that’s too small.

A larger air conditioner will cost more, and it will probably make the room too cold. It will also cycle on and off more frequently than a properly sized unit and it won’t be able to properly control the humidity level, leaving you with a cold, damp environment. That’s not very comfortable.

Other Factors

The square footage is definitely the most important piece of data you’ll need before buying a new air conditioner for any room in your house. But don’t forget to take some other factors into account as well. For instance, if the room has particularly high ceilings or receives a lot of direct sunlight, you’ll probably need a slightly more powerful unit than the straight square footage would indicate.

If you’re not sure how certain features of your home will impact your buying decision, call a professional who can help you get a more exact idea of what it will take to stay cool.

Continue Reading

What Is Forced Air Heating?

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Chances are that you’ve heard the term forced air heating before, particularly if you’re in the market for a new home heating system. But what does that actually mean? The truth is that if you’re asking this question, you’re not alone. There are so many types of home heating systems out there that it’s common to be a bit confused and overwhelmed by it all.

The truth is that a forced air heating system is simply a heating system that distributes heat throughout your house using air to carry it. In this type of system, heated air travels through a system of ducts and is expelled through vents into the different rooms and areas of your home in order to maintain a particular temperature. That temperature, of course, is whatever you set your thermostat to, and when the desired temperature is reached, the heat will shut off until the temperature drops down again.

The main difference between the different types of forced air heating systems is the type of equipment that heats the air. For instance, you could have a gas furnace, an electric furnace, a heat pump or a hydronic coil. All of these are capable of heating air, and when paired with a fan, blower or air handler, can distribute heated air throughout your home.

Many forced air heating systems are remarkably energy efficient and can effectively keep you home comfortable all winter long. Additionally, they are generally made to be incorporated with central air conditioning systems for year round temperature control. Heat pumps are especially convenient in this way, as they’re able to both heat and cool your home depending on the season and your home comfort needs.

Particularly if you already have ductwork in place or if you’re choosing a heating system for a new construction home, it can make a lot of sense to opt for some type of forced air heating. However, if you’re looking to replace an existing heating system in a house that doesn’t already have ductwork in place, the need to put it in can add a lot to the overall installation costs of the system.

Continue Reading

How Much Will a High Efficiency Furnace Save Me?

Monday, February 28th, 2011

The furnaces you can buy these days are all much more energy efficient than those available even 10 years ago. However, that doesn’t mean that all of the current models are created equal. There is still a pretty big variation when it comes to energy efficiency and when it comes to price, so you need to really know what you’re looking for if you want to get the best deal out there.

The first thing you should understand when you’re trying to pick out a furnace is how energy efficiency for this type of equipment it measured. All furnaces come with an annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) rating that reflects just exactly how energy efficient they are.

Any furnace you buy today will have an AFUE of at least 80%, but it’s possible to purchase models with AFUEs of 97% or more. Of course, energy efficiency is generally a good thing, but there are some other things to consider when you’re trying to decide just how energy efficient you need your new furnace to be.

What this calculation really comes down to is how much you’ll be able to save monthly and annually with a higher efficiency furnace. While your heating bills will certainly be lower the higher the furnace’s efficiency is, you will also pay more up front for the highest efficiency models.

This higher purchase price may be worth it, however, if you live in an area with particularly harsh winters. If your heating load is very high and you’ll be using your furnace a lot, your monthly savings will make up for the higher initial price of the high efficiency furnace in a reasonable amount of time.

However, if you live in an area with relatively mild winters and you won’t be demanding a whole lot of your furnace, then the amount you’ll save each month with the highest efficiency models really won’t add up to much.

Keep in mind that a furnace with an 80% AFUE still may be more efficient than your current furnace and will potentially save you a considerable amount monthly when compared to the unit you’re currently using.  However, current utility rebates and government tax credits have made 95% AFUE furnaces almost as affordable as less efficient 80% AFUE furnaces.

At Carney Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning, we are proud to serve the entire Bucks and Montgomery Counties with furnace repair and maintenance services. Whether you live in Dublin, Worcester, Collegeville, or Doylestown, we’ve got you covered.

Continue Reading

Energy Efficiency Tax Credits Extended for 2011

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

Good News! The tax credit for energy-efficient home improvements has been extended for another year.

However, the tax credit will be less in 2011 than it was in 2010 and 2009 – so if you can purchase your energy-efficient appliances now, you should!

For 2009 and 2010, a taxpayer can take a total of 30% of the value of energy-efficient home improvements, up to a maximum of $1500 for both years combined. For 2011, the tax credit is offered for only 10% of the cost of energy-efficient home improvements, up to a maximum of $500.

Other restrictions also apply for 2011. Certain appliances have their own maximum credit amount. For example, you can only get up to $300 for a water heater. Efficiency requirements have increased as well in certain cases – for example, gas boilers must now be 95% efficient. Tax credit requirements for gas furnaces remains at 95%, as it has been for the last two years.  This means that not all Energy Star appliances will qualify.

And, if you claim credits in 2009 or 2010, they count against the $500 maximum for 2011. If you’ve already taken more than $500 in tax credits, you can’t claim anything more in 2011.

Remember, too, that the tax credits are only for improvements to an existing home that is your principal residence. New construction and rentals don’t qualify.

If you’ve been thinking of upgrading to more energy-efficient equipment, don’t make it a New Year’s resolution: do it now!

But procrastinators take heart: even if you don’t get around to buying until next year, you’ll still get some benefits.

215.346.7160

215.346.7160

Continue Reading