Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Line Lexington’

Line Lexington Geothermal Tip: Common Geothermal Heat Pump Repairs

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Your Line Lexington home’s geothermal heating and air conditioning system is a pretty incredible piece of equipment. But just like other heating systems, they rely on a heat pump and a series of ducts to push the heated or cooled air throughout your home. When you have trouble with your heat pump, your geothermal system won’t be able to work correctly either. We’ve put together a list of some of the most common problems that we see with heat pumps. If you are experiencing any of these issues, contact your local Line Lexington geothermal professionals immediately.

Insufficient Heat

If your geothermal system has stopped producing enough heat for your home it could be the result of a number of things. Related to your heat pump, the first thing you’ll want to check is the ducts going from your heat pump to your home and their corresponding air filters. There is a good chance that the problem is dirty ducts and a clogged air filter. If that is the case, simply clean the ducts and change the air filter. If this doesn’t fix the problem, you’ll also want to check your thermostat and possibly have it replaced by a professional heating company.

No Heat

If your heat pump has simply stopped producing heat entire it could be a simple fix. Check the power supply to make sure that the main connection isn’t corroded or broken.

Leaks

Leaks in your geothermal system can cause a lot of different problems, including insufficient heating from your water source heat pump. If you think that any of your underground pipes is leaking, call a professional right away to examine your system and make sure nothing needs to be repaired or replaced.

If you’re having any of these issues or other issues with your geothermal heat pump, then call the experts at Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling. We have experience working with geothermal systems in Line Lexington and can make sure your system gets back up and running quickly.

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Why is My Central Air Conditioner Making Noise?

Monday, July 9th, 2012

A good air conditioner is a life saver in the midst of a hot and sticky summer, but just because the system makes you comfortable and makes the hottest months bearable doesn’t mean you want to hear it clanging and banging all summer. If you notice excess noise coming from your Newtown air conditioner, it might be a problem that can be fixed by your technician. Here are some common causes of excess noise from an air conditioner and what you can do to fix them.

  • Blower – The blower is a motor and fan blade assembly. If the blade touches the housing or if the motor needs a tune up, it might start to make excess noise. Loose screws, foreign objects, or a need for oiling or new parts will all cause noise problems.
  • Ductwork – If the sounds you’re hearing are in the ductwork or vents, it may be due to expansion and contraction in your ventilation system. This is normal and while it may be obnoxious, it tends not to persist during the hottest months as temperature won’t fluctuate as much.
  • Bubbling Sounds – If you hear a gurgly or bubbly noise coming from your indoor unit, it may be due to a blockage in the condensate line. The easiest solution is to have a tech clean the condensate line and check for any clogs or blockages in the system.
  • Clicking Sounds – If you hear a clicking sound, it is likely from the relay or contactor in the system. If this is the case, have a Newtown AC professional check it right away. Electrical problems are not to be taken lightly where your air conditioner is concerned.
  • Foreign Objects – Sometimes, the condenser fan will make a lot of loud noise because foreign objects get stuck in there. Sticks, leaves, toys, food from small animals – it can all get stuck in the fans and make a tremendous amount of noise. Keep the area around your condenser unit clear of debris and check it often if you hear loud noises.

Most noises from your Newtown central air conditioning unit are explainable and can be fixed relatively easily. If you cannot find the source of the noise, however, and it is only getting worse, call Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling before the problem grows.

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How to Choose a Water Treatment System

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Choosing a water treatment system in Fort Washington is a process that takes research and education in order to make an informed decision on what is needed and the best system for a given job.  Before diving into the details of the process it is ideal for consumers to educate themselves on the quality of the drinking water which is being supplied to their home or business.  Identifying contaminants which should be removed from the water allows for a necessary base knowledge-base which will help in identifying water treatment systems that treat the specific contaminants which need to be removed.

Water Treatment Technologies

Drinking water treatment systems utilize a number of technologies which are available, each technology focusing on producing a particular result by running water through it.

  • Filtration:  Separates undesirable elements from water by use of a layered absorbent medium such as carbon which keeps larger particles in the water from flowing through the membranes while still letting the water through.
  • Softeners:  Reduces the amount of hardness—calcium and magnesium—in the water, and replaces those ions with sodium or potassium.
  • Ultraviolet Treatment:  The use of ultraviolet light to disinfect water and reduce the amount of microorganisms present in water.
  • Reverse Osmosis:  Removal of large molecules and ions from water by applying higher pressure to one side of the membrane, then pushing the water through the selective membrane, leaving contaminants behind.
  • Distilment:  Boils water and collect the vapor as it condenses, leaving behind heavy metals but allowing some contaminants to remain which easily change to gasses.

Water Treatment Devices

In order to choose a water treatment system which is appropriate for your Fort Washington home’s needs, have a look at the water treatment devices which are currently available on the market.

  • Point-of-Entry System:  The purpose of this whole-house system is to treat a majority of the water which passes into a residence.  Some water softeners are POE systems.
  • Point-Of-Use System:  Water is treated in batches and delivered to a single tap such as an auxiliary faucet mounted next to the kitchen sink.  Within the POU system are a number of options such as the personal water bottle, pour through pitchers, faucet mounts, counter-top manual fills, counter-top connected to sink faucet, plumbed-in to an existing faucet, or plumed-in to a separate tap.

Once you decide what your water treatment requirements are, how extensively you want your water treated, and what contaminants you want to focus on eliminating, it will become quite easy to choose a water treatment system which is right for you. For help choosing the right system, give Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling a call today!

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Fix Water Leaks Before They Cause Major Damage

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Water leaks are one of the most destructive and frustrating problems in many Lansdale homes. Undetected water leaks can rot wood, destroy drywall, and cause mold to grow in unseen spaces of your home. Spending the time and money to find and fix water leaks before they cause significant damage is one of the most cost-effective actions a homeowner can take.

Sinks

Cabinets beneath kitchen and bathroom sinks are a good place to start. Look for signs of water damage or build up. Mold and mildew are telltale signs of water leaks. Touch the pipes, particularly the areas where they enter the faucet. Run the hot and cold water faucets for a few minutes and repeat the inspection. Finally, fill the sink with water, let it stand a few minutes and open the drain. Now check the drain pipe and the joints that connect it to the sink for leaks.

Dishwashers

Dishwashers can’t easily be checked for leaks without pulling them out from beneath the counter. But you can inspect the water lines that connect the dishwasher to the kitchen sink. For some units, you may be able to shine a flashlight beneath the dishwasher to look for puddles.

Toilets

Toilets can leak from the water supply pipes filling the tank and from the seal between the toilet and the waste pipe in the floor. Flush the toilet several times and carefully look for any signs of leaks in the  joints of the water supply pipe and the floor around the base of the toilet. Lift the lid off the tank and flush the toilet. When the tank refills, the water should completely shut off. If the flush valve or water control unit is old, corroded, or loose, the water will continue to run. Running water cools the water delivery pipe to the toilet and the tank, which will cause them to collect condensation in humid weather. The condensation will drip and eventually cause water damage to the floor behind the toilet. Bottom line – don’t ignore a running toilet. Have the water control and flush valve fixed or replaced.

 Tubs and Showers

Inspect the caulking around the tub or shower. Old, cracked, or missing caulking can allow water to leak into the wall. Water dripping from a leaky faucet or shower head will go down the drain and not cause any damage, but the faucet may also be leaking water behind the tub or shower.

Hot Water Heaters

Finally, inspect the hot water heater for leaks, and the boiler if the house has hot water heating. The first place to look is the floor around the appliance, but also look at the joints where the water pipes connect.

If you need any help with leak detection or any other problems with your Lansdale plumbing, give Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling a call!

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Where Are My Shut Off Valves?

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

Whenever you want to do some home repairs on your plumbing, whether it is to change a leaky faucet or fix knocking pipes, you need to shut off the main water supply. But, most home owners do not know where their main shutoff valves are, especially if they have just moved in or are renting a home that is unfamiliar to them. To help, here are some common places you can look for shutoff valves in your home.

  • Water Meter – The Water Meter, which you can usually find in your basement or just outside your home, will have a shutoff valve attached directly to it. Usually there will be two shutoff valves – one on each side of the meter (supply and home). To effectively shut off your water supply, turn the valve located before the meter.
  • Toilet Supply – Sometimes you do not need to cut off the main water supply to your entire house. It can be disruptive and the people in your home may not appreciate not having drinking water or a shower while you are working on the plumbing. So, when working on the toilet, always look for the toilet water valve located behind the tank. Sometimes this valve will be on the floor – other times it will be located on the wall just behind the tank.
  • Finding Wily Supplies – Sometimes the water supply may not be located where you would expect. It might be behind appliances or access panels or above your head somewhere. Most of the time, the water supply will still be in the basement, so start there and look carefully for the root of the pipes. Since most of the pipes in your home will originate at the supply line, you can usually trace them back to a single source.

If you still cannot find your main water supply line and shutoff valve, that does not mean it is hidden in the floor somewhere or outside. Sometimes, the supply lines are just in odd places, either because of strange construction or poor renovations by a past owner. If this is the case, get a second pair of eyes to help you hunt or as a last ditch option, call a plumber who will be able to more easily follow the lines back to their source. Nine times out of ten, you should be able to find and handle a main water supply on your own. But never rule out calling for a professional’s help if things get more complicated than anticipated.

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Green Your Plumbing

Monday, January 24th, 2011

These days, “green plumbing” is getting increasing attention, especially in dry areas like the southwestern US.

“Green plumbing” helps the environment by doing one or more of the following:

  • Saving water
  • Saving energy
  • Using environmentally-friendly materials

There are a wide range of green plumbing products that can make a big difference in how much water and energy your home uses. They range from simple accessories that cost less than $20 to major home remodels. Here are a few of them, ranging from the simple and immediate to larger investments with a longer-term payback.

  • Low-flow showerheads and faucet accessories (often called “aerators”). Check the side of your current faucet and showerhead to see if they use more than 1.5 GPM and 2.0 GPM, respectively. If they do, you can benefit from an upgrade. Look for the EPA WaterSense label to be sure that your new showerheads and faucet accessories are water-efficient.
  • Hot water heater blankets and pipe insulation.You don’t need to insulate your hot water heater and  pipes to prevent freezing, but doing it will save money, water, and energy, and (as a bonus) you’ll enjoy hotter showers in the winter. This is a simple DIY job and the materials are extremely affordable.
  • Touch-free faucets. When you’re not actively using them, touch-free faucets shut off. According to industry estimates, the result can be a water savings of up to 70%. Touch-free faucet technology has improved greatly in recent years, and sensors are now very reliable. If you like your current faucet and want to keep it, there are also touch-free faucet conversion kits.
  • Dual-flush toilets. As the name suggests, these toilets have two different flushes: a “half-flush” for liquid waste, and a “full flush” for solids. Dual-flush toilets are standard in many European countries and are becoming increasingly popular in the U.S. because of their water-saving potential (up to 68% over conventional toilets) and sleek styling.
  • Tankless water heaters. Unlike conventional tank heaters, which use energy constantly to maintain a reserve supply of hot water, tankless heaters only use energy when hot water is needed.  Tankless water heaters are not quite “instantaneous”, as some manufacturers claim, but they provide hot water within a few seconds. Good quality heaters can provide hot water to multiple fixtures simultaneously.
  • Sprinkler system upgrades. Much of the water from spray sprinkler systems evaporates. Trickle and drip irrigation systems can improve water efficiency by delivering smaller amounts of water directly to the base of the plant. Other products, such as pressure regulating spray heads and rotors and automatic rain sensors, can also save thousands of gallons a year. Another option is to re-use laundry waste water by diverting it into the garden. This can be a DIY project or can be built directly into your plumbing. Check with your local authorities to find out if this is permitted in your area.

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