Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Furnace Repair’

Should I Arrange for Maintenance When My Heater Isn’t Working Right?

Monday, December 10th, 2018

wrenchesThis is a question we often hear from customers, and we want to address it here because it helps to explain what maintenance is and why it’s vital.

When you notice something wrong with your home heating system, whether a furnace, heat pump, or another type of heater, you should call a service professional. This is the right instinct! Attempting to handle repairs on your own rarely solves the problem. In the case of gas-powered heaters, it’s potentially hazardous (and may be illegal). However, what you want to call technicians for is repairs. You don’t want to schedule maintenance to “tune-up” the furnace and stop what’s wrong. That’s not what maintenance is for.

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3 Ways to Make Sure Your Furnace is Short-Lived

Monday, February 19th, 2018

FurnaceThere are right and wrong ways to take care of your furnace if you want to last as long as possible. Most of the time, we talk about all the things that you should be doing to keep your furnace in top condition as long as you can. Today, though, we’d like to cover some of the things you should do if you want to waste your system’s life and replace it as early as possible. Let’s begin.

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Be Careful of These Furnace Issues

Monday, January 8th, 2018

gas-furnaceWinter is the time of year when furnaces are placed under the most pressure, which also makes it the time of year when those systems are most likely to develop problems. Considering the record low temperatures we’re currently experiencing across the country, you need to be especially vigilant for any signs that your furnace is having trouble this winter. Make sure that you familiarize yourself with the issues below, and the symptoms that indicate a need for furnace repairs.

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Problems That can Lead to Furnace Replacement

Monday, February 20th, 2017

Furnaces can last a fair few years, provided you take proper care of them. That means scheduling preventive maintenance at least once a year, but it also means calling for repairs as soon as you suspect that something is wrong with the system. Even seemingly minor issues can actually cause serious damage in some cases, so it’s never a good idea to ignore a problem once it presents itself. Let’s take a look at some of the more dire furnace issues, and how to identify them.

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How Short Cycling Threatens Your Furnace

Monday, December 5th, 2016

If you notice your furnace turning itself on and off every couple of minutes this winter, don’t ignore it. That behavior is called short cycling, and it is a major threat to the health of your system. If the problem is not solved as quickly as possible, it can cause all kinds of issues up to and including full breakdowns. Let’s take a look at why short cycling happens, and why you need to have it repaired as quickly as possible.

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Watch for These Furnace Problems

Monday, October 24th, 2016

If you’re using a furnace to keep warm this winter, you’re going to be putting more stress on it than during other times of the year. That means a greater chance for problems to occur, so it’s important that you keep an eye out for any signs that your furnace is in trouble. The faster you can get your furnace repaired, the more damage you can prevent. Let’s take a look at some of the common problems your furnace can run into.

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What You Need to Know About Furnace Short Cycling

Monday, January 18th, 2016

If you’ve ever noticed your furnace turning itself on and off every couple of minutes, don’t ignore it. That behavior is called “short cycling,” and it’s a serious threat to the health of your system. If you don’t have the short cycling taken care of as quickly as possible, you are running the risk of your furnace breaking down very soon. Let’s take a look at what causes short cycling, and what can happen if you don’t get it repaired.

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What to Do If Your Furnace Keeps Turning On and Off: Warrington Heating Tip

Monday, November 12th, 2012

If the Warrington home’s furnace turns on and then a short time later shuts off, this is known as short cycling. Not only is short cycling hard on your equipment, but it also greatly reduces the efficiency of your furnace. Below, we describe what you should do if your furnace is short cycling.

Causes of Short Cycling

There are a number of reasons that your furnace might be short cycling. Here are just a few of them:

  • Furnace is too big – In this case, your furnace will heat your home very quickly and then shut off. As your home cools again, the furnace will turn on and heat up your home once again. Having a properly sized furnace is critical to your home’s comfort and efficiency.
  • Clogged air filter – This is by far the most common cause of short cycling. When your air filter clogs, it restricts air from getting into your furnace. As your furnace heats up the heat exchanger, air is supposed to blow over the exchanger to carry the heat into your home. Without that air flow, your furnace will overheat and shut off.
  • Thermostat – Sometimes, the cause of short cycling is a malfunctioning thermostat. If the thermostat isn’t working properly, it could be turning the furnace on and off mistakenly.

Why Short Cycling is a Problem

  • More wear on your furnace – With all the constant turning on and off, it puts extra strain on your furnace. This increases the rate of wear and can also potentially increase repair costs.
  • Reduced efficiency – With the furnace turning on and off, it doesn’t get the chance to realize any kind of efficiency that comes from running for an extended period of time.

What To Do If Your Furnace Is Short Cycling

The first thing you should do is check your air filter. If it’s dirty, you should change it out immediately. Not only can a clogged air filter cause short cycling, but it can also be the cause of other serious issues with your furnace.

If that doesn’t fix the problem, then you will most likely have to call a heating contractor. Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling offers complete furnaces services in Warrington. If your furnace is short cycling we can come to your home, diagnose the problem and offer a solution.

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Is Your Furnace Not Blowing Enough Air?

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

Have you ever been in your Jamison house in the winter, listening to the furnace trying to heat the house, but noticed that the whole place is still cold? If you checked the heating vents in this situation, you would probably find that there is not much air flow coming out of them, which is why you are still freezing.

It is entirely possible for the furnace to be burning away, producing hot air, without enough of that warm air ever actually being distributed through your home. So it continues to run and run, resulting in excess wear and tear on the heating system that will probably shorten its productive life, as well as keeping your whole home too chilly.

Why does that happen? There are a several common culprits for insufficient air flow from your Jamison furnace. Below is a list of the most frequent offenders, along with solutions for each:

  • Cause: Dirty or broken air filter. An air filter that has accumulated too much build up or is damaged will slow down air flow in a hurry.
    Solution: Clean or replace the air filter as necessary. This should be part of routine furnace maintenance in order to ensure efficient operation. Refer to the manufacturer’s recommendations to see how often you should check your air filter(s).
  • Cause: Damaged, corroded, broken or collapsed ductwork. Your ducts are like the road that warm air travels on. If the road is out, then no one can get through. Simple as that.
    Solution: Have a professional inspect and repair your ductwork. A routine ductwork check is also part of a professional’s annual maintenance inspection.
  • Cause: Blower fan not blowing enough. This can be caused by a loose fan belt, or a dirty motor.
    Solution: First, clean the blower fan and the area around it. It has to deal with a lot of air, so it naturally becomes dirty over time. If that doesn’t fix it, the fan belt probably needs to be replaced.

There are some other causes of improper furnace air flow, but those are the most common and easiest to detect and repair. If your heat registers are not returning any warm air at all, that is likely a different problem and you should call Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling to look at the system right away.

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Newtown Furnace Repair Service: Flame Sensor

Monday, February 6th, 2012

A flame sensor is a very small and specific component of a furnace, but when it is malfunctioning, it can completely shut down the operation of your Newtown home’s furnace. To start with, let’s summarize how a flame sensor works.

The flame sensor is a rod that sits directly in the path of one of the burners in your furnace. When the burner is on, the flame passes by the tip of the flame sensor, heating it up. If the furnace is on but the flame sensor is not hot, the furnace automatically switches off to avoid a continuous gas leak. So, the flame sensor is a safety measure.

Sometimes, though, the furnace can be operating just fine, and the burners are firing perfectly, the flame sensor still sends the signal that there is no flame and shuts down the furnace. This is obviously a problem.

Often, this is just a symptom of build-up on the flame sensor that is insulating it and preventing it from heating properly. We strongly recommend that you call a professional to repair it; here are the steps that they will follow:

  • Locate the flame sensor on the furnace. It is a thin metal rod that extends through a bracket and into the path of the flame as it is expelled from one of the burners.
  • Turn off the power to the furnace.
  • Loosen the bracket holding the flame sensor in place and gently withdraw it.
  • Using fine grit sandpaper or emery cloth, gently rub away any combustion build-up that has accumulated on the end of the flame sensor.
  • Making sure all the build-up has been removed, replace the flame sensor in the bracket. Turn the furnace back on to test it.

If all went well, the furnace should remain on now, until the desired heating temperature is reached.  Most often, the problem is as simple as giving the flame sensor a good cleaning up. Since you are dealing with quite delicate equipment, you can understand why it is so important to call in a professional if suspect a problem with your flame sensor.

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