Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Bathroom Plumbing’

Bathroom Plumbing Upgrades You Never Knew You Needed

Monday, August 19th, 2019

When you hear the word spa, what do you think of? Maybe a nice hotel, some pedicures, detoxing in a steam room while you relax. While that definitely sounds like a wonderful experience, what if we told you that there could be a spa in your own bathroom?

No, your neighbors don’t have a personal spa crew that operates out of their bathroom—they just paid for the perfect bathroom renovation that suited them. Bathroom renovations and upgrades can be both aesthetically pleasing but also incredibly affordable when you contact the right Doylestown, PA plumber. We have got all different sizes of shower, tub, and faucet installations that could make your bathroom feel like a real spa. Just remember that underneath the pretty sinks and ceramic tiles needs to be a foundation of stable plumbing that we can help you set up.

Well, prepare to be amazed!

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Reasons to Consider a Bathroom Remodel

Monday, April 1st, 2019

Luxury-bathroomYou can look to a professional plumber in Ambler, PA to help with most types of bathroom plumbing needs: repairs, installing new fixtures, drain cleaning, etc. But not all plumbers provide full bathroom remodeling services to transform an old bathroom into a bright new space.

At Carney, we’re proud to offer complete bathroom remodeling. We’ll put in new sinks, tubs, showers, tiles, vanities, cabinets, and more. We can even add a bathroom to a space such as a basement. We combine our superb plumbing expertise with the best in modern bathroom design concepts.

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What to Do If Your Toilet Overflows

Monday, March 18th, 2019

toilet-with-button-flushThis is one of the most common plumbing problems we get emergency calls about. We understand—it’s alarming to have a toilet suddenly start spilling water onto a bathroom floor with no signs of stopping!

We have good news for you! An overflowing toilet doesn’t have to be a major disaster for your home. First of all, we can fix it—and we provide same-day service so you won’t have to go with an unusable bathroom for long. We know how important this room is to your household’s daily life, and we’ll be there fast to have the toilet fixed.

Second, if you take the right steps, you can prevent further problems from the overflowing toilet and stop water damage. Below are guidelines for what to do when you encounter this sudden plumbing trouble.

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Plumbing Basics: Learning the Parts of a Toilet

Monday, May 7th, 2012

The majority of homeowners are not aware that they can repair most minor toilet problems on their own. Whether it’s overflowing or running more than it should, toilets can be repaired often without calling a Willow Grove plumber; however, it is important to know the basic parts of a toilet before trying to troubleshoot toilet issues.

Here’s a guide to learning the parts of a toilet:

Willow Grove Plumbing Tip - Parts of a Toilet

Tank: Pictured above (inspectapedia.com) is the tank on the back of the toilet, which holds the water supply for the bowl and the components that you need to know to fix most problems.

Bowl: Holds wastewater and uses the water from the tank to flush the waste.

Flush Handle:  The flush handle is the part that everyone knows, but it’s important to know what happens when you flush: the flush handle is connected to the trip lever, which lifts the flapper and allows the water for the tank to enter the bowl.

Trip Lever: The trip lever is the part that you need to know for a running toilet. It attaches the flush handle to the flapper, and when you flush the toilet, this lever lifts the flapper (sometimes called a flapper valve) and releases the water from the tank into the bowl to force the wastewater in the bowl down the sewer drain. When a toilet is running, you can simply lift the trip lever to lower the water level in the tank.

Float Ball: The float ball basically measures the water in the tank. After you flush, the ball will fall as the water level lowers, and the ball will rise again as the tank fills from the toilet main water supply. When the tank has enough water, the toilet will stop running.

Overflow Tube: This is the tube that will stop the tank from overflowing if the toilet is running. It leads into the drain and pushes out all the excess water. Sometimes you can remove the rubber water supply tube from the overflow tube to keep a toilet from overflowing if you are not able to shut off the main water valve behind the toilet.

Flapper Valve: This is the part to know whenever you have an overflowing toilet or a backup. The flapper is attached to the flush handle by a chain and the trip lever. Whenever the flapper is pushed down, the water cannot leave the tank, so when you flush, it creates a suction to pressurize the water entering the bowl so that it has enough force to flush the waste. If your toilet is overflowing, push the flapper down with your hand so that it stops the water from entering the bowl. Most people are afraid to put their hands in the tank because they associate the tank water with the water in the bowl. The water in the toilet tank is clean because it comes from the main water supply line, which is attached to the stop valve.

Stop Valve: This is also called the toilet supply valve because it controls the fresh water supply going into the tank. It is usually located behind the toilet near the floor, and turning it off is another way to stop an overflowing toilet because the tank cannot fill once it is turned off.  It is attached to the supply tube, which attaches to the refill tube.

Supply Tube: Although the supply tube and refill tube are connected, they are two different parts. People often use their names interchangeable, but what’s most important to know is that the supply tube supplies the water from the main line and into the refill tube, which refills the bowl.

Refill Tube: When the float ball is down, the refill tube fills the bowl with the water from the supply tube. After a flush, the ball rises, and when it reaches a certain level, the refill tube stops the flow of water into the bowl.

Trap: The trap is a seal that prevents backflow and strong odors from the main sewage line. If you smell sewage in your bathroom, particularly near the toilet, you could have a bad seal or faulty trap. Troubleshooting a trap usually requires a plumber, unless you are familiar with toilet installation.

Wax Ring: Another cause for bad odors is the wax ring, which is a seal between the toilet and the sewage line. A faulty wax ring could also cause leaking at the bottom of the toilet. Call a plumber whenever you aren’t sure about leaking toilets or strong sewer odors; there could be a problem in the main sewer line.

Call Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling if you have any questions about these components, or if you want to trouble shoot with one of our Willow Grove plumbers.

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Plumber Tip: How to Replace a Bathroom Vanity

Monday, December 12th, 2011

Because it looks something like a dresser combined with a kitchen counter, you may think of your Jamison home’s bathroom vanity as being a piece of furniture, and therefore that it is simple to replace. Well, there’s good news and bad news there.

The bad news is that because of the sinks and pipes involved, your vanity is part of your plumbing system, so it’s a little trickier than getting a new sofa.

The good news is that it is still something you can do on your own – or at least with a friend – in a few hours or so. After you have measured the space and purchased the new vanity, here is how you can go about replacing the old one:

  1. Shut off the water supply. This is always the first step when undertaking any sort of plumbing work. Put a bucket beneath the sink to catch any water that drips from the supply lines after you disconnect them.
  2. Using a putty or utility knife, loosen the caulk that is sealing the countertop. Gently remove the countertop.
  3. Detach the vanity from the wall. Most vanity units are screwed in place to the wall, so just spot and remove all the screws.
  4. Mark the studs in preparation for positioning the new vanity. Hint: the old one was already drilled into the studs, if it was done properly.
  5. Put the new vanity in place, making sure it is flush to the wall.
  6. Attach the new vanity to the wall, taking care to screw into the wall studs that you marked in step #4.
  7. Put a bead of caulk along the top of the vanity base to hold the countertop in place. Carefully set in the new countertop.
  8. Reconnect the plumbing that you disconnected as part of step #1.
  9. Put down a thin bead of caulk along the edges of the countertop below the lip. Smooth the caulk in place with a damp rag.

Now your new vanity is all set. Allow the caulk to dry before getting moisture near it, and don’t forget to turn the water supply back on! And if you need any help, talk to your local plumber.

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