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Reasons to Choose a Whole-House Generator Over a Portable Option

Generators come in two categories: permanent, which are whole-home generators or back-up generators, and portable, also known as standby. The capability of these generators is very different, and these differences should be an important factor when deciding which type of generator to choose for your home. As we have seen over the last few years, weather events, large blackouts and flooding are all possible at any time. Knowing you have the back-up generator you need for your King of Prussia home is critical to your peace of mind. So what are the differences between a permanent and standby generator? Let’s take a look.

Standby Generators

Standby generators quite small and for good reason: they are meant to be portable and support only a few key items in your home, such as your refrigerator, several lamps or a television. They do not connect to a main source of fuel such as a natural gas line or propane tank; instead, they have fuel tank and use either gasoline or diesel fuel for power. The main components of standby generators are the engine, the power generator head and the fuel tank. The engine generates the energy needed for the generator head to produce the electricity. The fuel, which is typically gasoline or diesel (but can also be propane), feeds the engine. To connect to the generator’s power it is usually necessary to have an extension cord that will carry the electricity into your home. Re-fueling is necessary, which means that to have continuous power, you’ll need access to continuous fuel, which can be a challenge during a major weather event or power outage. The bottom line: if you only need to power a single large item for a few hours, a standby generator is the way to go; otherwise, you’ll want to consider a whole-home generator.

Permanent Generators

Permanent generators use natural gas, propane (LP) or diesel for fuel. With natural gas and LP, the generator is connected directly to the main line (gas) or tank (LP); with diesel, there is a large tank that resides under the generator that requires re-fueling should you use it. Whole-home generators are connected directly to your home’s electrical panel; they are equipped with sensors that detect when an interruption in power has occurred. Should the power go out, the generator automatically turns on and starts sending power to the electrical box to keep your home running. When the power returns, the generator automatically turns off. Whole-home generators can provide up to 5,000 watts of power to your home, so not everything can run as usual, but your home will still be comfortable.

Back-up generators can keep you safe, secure and comfortable during any kind of serious power outage. Call Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling today to learn more.

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