Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling Blog : Archive for the ‘Heat Pump Systems’ Category

Montgomery County Heating Guide: How Ductless Heating Works

Monday, October 13th, 2014

Ductless systems have been around for a while, having mostly been used in commercial properties. However, over the last few years they have become very popular choices for homeowners. There can be some initial confusion over how a ductless system works, especially in regard to how it provides both heating and cooling for your home. We’ll explain more about that below, but remember that for any of your ductless heating needs in Montgomery County, there’s only one company you should call: Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling.

How Does Ductless Heating Work?

Ductless heating has two important components:

  • Outdoor unit
  • Indoor blowers

It is the heat pump technology that allows the system to offer both heating and cooling for your home. Heat pumps come equipped with a reversing valve that allows the system to change the flow of refrigerant, thereby creating the two modes of heating or cooling.

The way a ductless system works is that the outdoor unit is connected to the indoor blowers via a conduit that is placed in an exterior wall. The outdoor unit contains the compressor and condenser, and each indoor blower has a small set of coils, air filter and blower fan. The indoor blowers are about 35” long and can be mounted flush against walls or hung from ceilings. The conduit contains a refrigerant line, power cord and condensate drain pipe that runs between each blower and the outdoor unit. An outdoor unit can support up to 4 blowers.

The heating (or cooling) cycle begins when you turn on a blower. This signals the refrigerant to flow and the other motors to start. Each indoor blower operates independently.

Benefits of a Ductless System

We’ve already mentioned that a ductless system can offer you both heating and cooling, but here are some other benefits to consider:

  • Easy installation – there is no need to install ductwork, and installing the equipment is straightforward: the outdoor unit is secured outside and the indoor blowers are mounted. A small 3” hole is drilled into an exterior wall and the two units are connected.
  • Customized comfort – because the blowers of a ductless system work independently, a ductless system allows you zone control.
  • Energy efficiency – with a ductless system, you use only the heating and cooling you need. This helps improve energy efficiency.

If you think a ductless heating system in Montgomery County is a good fit for your home, call Carney Plumbing Heating & Cooling today and schedule an appointment.

 

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Effects of Excessive Snow on Heat Pumps

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

Due to recent excessive snowfall, we wanted to pass along a few tips for our customers who own heat pump systems.

Heat Pumps and Snow

Excessive snow can reduce a heat pump's ability to heat your home.

1. Heat pumps draw air from the areas surrounding them (all four sides of the outdoor unit). It is important to clear these areas of snow and ice build up in order to allow air to freely reach the heat pump. This will allow the heat pump to operate as efficiently as possible and will alleviate strain on the heat pump.

2. If possible, the space (air gap) between the heat pump and the plastic or concrete pad that the unit itself sits on should be cleared of snow to allow for drainage. Customers who have had heat pumps installed by Carney will note that there are two concrete lentels (rectangular blocks of concrete) that sit on either side of the base of the heat pump. The area between those lentils is the area that should be cleared.

3. Generally speaking, most heat pumps discharge air in an upward direction from the top of the unit. It is important to make sure that this area is clear of snow and ice to allow air to easily discharge (this is the air that is being drawn from the sides of the unit noted in item #1).

A note to Carney customers for whom we have installed a Trane XLi heat pump system: Trane’s XLi series heat pumps employ a “Weathergaurd” top that is designed to protect the heat pump from the affects of snow and ice on the top of the unit. In most cases snow and ice on the top of the unit will have no impact on an XLi heat pump. Air is discharged from the sides of the upper part of the heat pump instead. This area can be distinguished from the intake area as it is a) darker in color, b) plastic as opposed to steel, c) has a wider air gap between the fins and d) the direction of the louvers points upwards at an approximate 45 degree angle as opposed to downwards at the steel louvers. We have installed several hundred of Trane’s XLi series heat pump each year since 2003, so there is a good chance that you may own one – which is very beneficial at this time!
To help you identify if you own a Trane XLi heat pump, the following link will take you to an image of a Trane XL20i, which employs the same “Weathergaurd” top found on Trane XL16i, XL15i, XL14i and XL13i. http://www.trane.com/Residential/Products/Heat-Pumps/XL20i-Heat-Pumps

4. DO NOT attempt to forcefully remove ice build up from any part of the heat pump. If you cannot remove snow or ice easily with a broom or brush, do not try to pry or chisel ice from the unit. Doing so could cause severe or irrepairable damage to the heat pump.

5. If your heat pump is located in an area that is subject to exposure to melting snow and ice (such as underneath an overhang or gutter that may be frozen), check the unit repeatedly to ensure that ice has not built up inside the heat pump.

6. If you cannot clear the heat pump of snow and ice for any reason, switch the system to “Emergency Heat” at the thermostat. This will turn the heat pump off and engage electric resistance heaters that are located inside in order to provide heat for your home. This is a more expensive mode of operation for a heat pump system, so we do not advise continuing in this mode for more than a few days. If at that time, the snow and ice around the heat pump has not melted, feel free to schedule a service call with Carney and a technician from our service team will be happy to assist you.

Finally, if you are a geothermal heat pump owner – you have nothing to worry about! There is no outdoor unit, so there is no concern of snow or ice!

Further heating information can be found on our Heating FAQ’s Page.
As always, feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns at 215.346.7160 .

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When Should You Replace Your Existing Heat Pump?

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Nobody wants to think about having to replace a home heating and cooling system. It’s a big job and a new system probably won’t come cheap – not if it’s worth buying anyway. But in the end, you’ll be better off replacing your heat pump sooner rather than later if you start noticing signs that it may be on its way out.

So what are these signs? Well, they’re actually pretty easy to recognize if you know what to look for. For instance, if your heat pump is suddenly making more noise than it used to, there’s a good chance that something’s going wrong inside. This may only require a minor repair, but if minor repairs like this become a regular occurrence, you should start seriously thinking about looking around for a new system.

The cost of even minor repairs will certainly add up quickly over time, and you’ll have to seriously think about whether it makes financial sense to continue to repair an older system rather than simply replacing it with a new one. Chances are that you’ll have to invest in a new one anyway, and the sooner you do it, the less you’ll have paid for repairs to a system you were just going to get rid of anyway.

Also, if you’re starting to notice humidity problems in your home or if some parts of your house are being kept warmer than others, it may very well be a sign that you heat pump isn’t working like it should. Again, this can sometimes be rectified with repair work, but especially if your heat pump is 10 years old or more, it probably makes more sense to replace it.

Another item to keep an eye on when you’re worried about how well your heat pump is working is your monthly energy bill. If you notice a sudden or even a gradual but steady increase over time that you know isn’t a result of an increase in energy prices in your area, you should suspect that your heat pump isn’t working like it should.

Even if it’s still keeping your home at a comfortable temperature, the fact that your heat pump is using more energy to do it is a sign that there’s something wrong with your system. Plus, newer systems are generally more energy efficient anyway, so you’ll be making up for the initial investment of purchasing a new system when you start paying even less on your monthly energy bills.

Nobody wants to think about having to replace a home heating and cooling system. It’s a big job and a new system probably won’t come cheap – not if it’s worth buying anyway. But in the end, you’ll be better off replacing your heat pump sooner rather than later if you start noticing signs that it may be on its way out.

So what are these signs? Well, they’re actually pretty easy to recognize if you know what to look for. For instance, if your heat pump is suddenly making more noise than it used to, there’s a good chance that something’s going wrong inside. This may only require a minor repair, but if minor repairs like this become a regular occurrence, you should start seriously thinking about looking around for a new system.

The cost of even minor repairs will certainly add up quickly over time, and you’ll have to seriously think about whether it makes financial sense to continue to repair an older system rather than simply replacing it with a new one. Chances are that you’ll have to invest in a new one anyway, and the sooner you do it, the less you’ll have paid for repairs to a system you were just going to get rid of anyway.

Also, if you’re starting to notice humidity problems in your home or if some parts of your house are being kept warmer than others, it may very well be a sign that you heat pump isn’t working like it should. Again, this can sometimes be rectified with repair work, but especially if your heat pump is 10 years old or more, it probably makes more sense to replace it.

Another item to keep an eye on when you’re worried about how we

Nobody wants to think about having to replace a home heating and cooling system. It’s a big job and a new system probably won’t come cheap – not if it’s worth buying anyway. But in the end, you’ll be better off replacing your heat pump sooner rather than later if you start noticing signs that it may be on its way out.

So what are these signs? Well, they’re actually pretty easy to recognize if you know what to look for. For instance, if your heat pump is suddenly making more noise than it used to, there’s a good chance that something’s going wrong inside. This may only require a minor repair, but if minor repairs like this become a regular occurrence, you should start seriously thinking about looking around for a new system.

The cost of even minor repairs will certainly add up quickly over time, and you’ll have to seriously think about whether it makes financial sense to continue to repair an older system rather than simply replacing it with a new one. Chances are that you’ll have to invest in a new one anyway, and the sooner you do it, the less you’ll have paid for repairs to a system you were just going to get rid of anyway.

Also, if you’re starting to notice humidity problems in your home or if some parts of your house are being kept warmer than others, it may very well be a sign that you heat pump isn’t working like it should. Again, this can sometimes be rectified with repair work, but especially if your heat pump is 10 years old or more, it probably makes more sense to replace it.

Another item to keep an eye on when you’re worried about how well your heat pump is working is your monthly energy bill. If you notice a sudden or even a gradual but steady increase over time that you know isn’t a result of an increase in energy prices in your area, you should suspect that your heat pump isn’t working like it should.

Even if it’s still keeping your home at a comfortable temperature, the fact that your heat pump is using more energy to do it is a sign that there’s something wrong with your system. Plus, newer systems are generally more energy efficient anyway, so you’ll be making up for the initial investment of purchasing a new system when you start paying even less on your monthly energy bills.

ll your heat pump is working is your monthly energy bill. If you notice a sudden or even a gradual but steady increase over time that you know isn’t a result of an increase in energy prices in your area, you should suspect that your heat pump isn’t working like it should.

Even if it’s still keeping your home at a comfortable temperature, the fact that your heat pump is using more energy to do it is a sign that there’s something wrong with your system. Plus, newer systems are generally more energy efficient anyway, so you’ll be making up for the initial investment of purchasing a new system when you start paying even less on your monthly energy bills.

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How Efficient Is a Heat Pump?

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Heat pumps are actually remarkably efficient when compared to some of the home heating alternatives out there. Especially if you’re already using electricity to heat your home, you can get generate huge savings on your monthly energy bills by switching to a heat pump system.

As their name suggests, heat pumps remove heat from the air and transfer that heat from one area to another. That means that in the winter, your heat pump will remove the heat from the air outside your home and pump that heat in to heat your home. During the summer months, that process is actually reversed, and heat pumps are able to cool your home by collecting the heat from your indoor air and pumping it outside.

Since heat pumps are actually just moving heat from one place to another rather than generating it all on their own, they don’t require much energy at all to operate. While you can buy furnaces that are as much as 97% energy efficient, they’re still using more energy than a heat pump would. The fact that the furnace is turning the vast majority of the energy that it uses into heat doesn’t mean that it still doesn’t require more energy to operate.

Just because heat pumps are more efficient than many other types of heating systems, you can’t just assume that all heat pumps are equally energy efficient. Just as different types and models of furnaces have different energy efficiency ratings, so too do the many types, sizes and models of heat pumps. Make sure you thoroughly compare your options before you settle on the right system for your home.

The energy efficiency rating of a furnace is easy to recognize, as each of them comes with a standard AFUE rating. If you’re looking to switch to heat pumps, however, it’s easy to get confused when you’re trying to compare the energy efficiency of various models.

Heat pumps actually have two separate measurements for energy efficiency. These are the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) and the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF). Energy efficiency measurements for heat pumps reflect both the cooling and heating efficiency of the system, and so what’s best for you may vary depending on what you’re more likely to use your heat pump for.

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How Does a Heat Pump Work?

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

If you’re in the market for a new home heating and cooling system, a heat pump is definitely an option worth considering. However, while the popularity of these systems is growing rapidly, many people still don’t understand what they’re all about. Before you go out and get yourself a new home comfort system, you should make sure you really know what you’re looking at.
As their name suggests, heat pumps move heat from one location to another. However, their name can be misleading as well. Heat pumps are able to both heat your home in the winter and keep it cool in the summer by taking heat from the air in one place and sending it to another.

For example, your heat pump will remove the heat from your indoor air in the summer and pump it outside to keep your home cool. In the winter, the process is reversed, and the heat pump gathers heat from the outdoor air and pumps it inside to keep you house warm.

Of course, it’s not hard to see how the air inside your home in the summer has heat in it. But the outdoor air in the winter is cold. So how does a heat pump heat your house with cold air? Well, the truth is that there is almost always some heat in the air, no matter how cold it seems to you and me.

In fact, the temperature would have to drop well into the negative range before there was absolutely no heat to be found in the air. And heat pumps are specially designed to find that heat and collect it.

Basically all heat pumps work on this principle. However, they can’t keep your house comfortable all on their own. Heat pumps are usually installed as part of a complete home heating and cooling system. This means they’ll be paired with an air handler that can circulate the temperature controlled air throughout the house.

There are also some heat pumps that supplement the amount of heat they’re able to pull out of the air by heating it as it passes through. These types of heat pumps are often more effective in cooler areas, but because they require more energy to actually generate heat, they’re not typically as energy efficient as models that rely on their ability to get heat only out of the air.

If you’re in the market for a new home heating and cooling system, a heat pump is definitely an option worth considering. However, while the popularity of these systems is growing rapidly, many people still don’t understand what they’re all about. Before you go out and get yourself a new home comfort system, you should make sure you really know what you’re looking at

As their name suggests, heat pumps move heat from one location to another. However, their name can be misleading as well. Heat pumps are able to both heat your home in the winter and keep it cool in the summer by taking heat from the air in one place and sending it to another.

For example, your heat pump will remove the heat from your indoor air in the summer and pump it outside to keep your home cool. In the winter, the process is reversed, and the heat pump gathers heat from the outdoor air and pumps it inside to keep you house warm.

Of course, it’s not hard to see how the air inside your home in the summer has heat in it. But the outdoor air in the winter is cold. So how does a heat pump heat your house with cold air? Well, the truth is that there is almost always some heat in the air, no matter how cold it seems to you and me.

In fact, the temperature would have to drop well into the negative range before there was absolutely no heat to be found in the air. And heat pumps are specially designed to find that heat and collect it.

Basically all heat pumps work on this princ

If you’re in the market for a new home heating and cooling system, a heat pump is definitely an option worth considering. However, while the popularity of these systems is growing rapidly, many people still don’t understand what they’re all about. Before you go out and get yourself a new home comfort system, you should make sure you really know what you’re looking at

As their name suggests, heat pumps move heat from one location to another. However, their name can be misleading as well. Heat pumps are able to both heat your home in the winter and keep it cool in the summer by taking heat from the air in one place and sending it to another.

For example, your heat pump will remove the heat from your indoor air in the summer and pump it outside to keep your home cool. In the winter, the process is reversed, and the heat pump gathers heat from the outdoor air and pumps it inside to keep you house warm.

Of course, it’s not hard to see how the air inside your home in the summer has heat in it. But the outdoor air in the winter is cold. So how does a heat pump heat your house with cold air? Well, the truth is that there is almost always some heat in the air, no matter how cold it seems to you and me.

In fact, the temperature would have to drop well into the negative range before there was absolutely no heat to be found in the air. And heat pumps are specially designed to find that heat and collect it.

Basically all heat pumps work on this principle. However, they can’t keep your house comfortable all on their own. Heat pumps are usually installed as part of a complete home heating and cooling system. This means they’ll be paired with an air handler that can circulate the temperature controlled air throughout the house.

There are also some heat pumps that supplement the amount of heat they’re able to pull out of the air by heating it as it passes through. These types of heat pumps are often more effective in cooler areas, but because they require more energy to actually generate heat, they’re not typically as energy efficient as models that rely on their ability to get heat only out of the air.

iple. However, they can’t keep your house comfortable all on their own. Heat pumps are usually installed as part of a complete home heating and cooling system. This means they’ll be paired with an air handler that can circulate the temperature controlled air throughout the house.

There are also some heat pumps that supplement the amount of heat they’re able to pull out of the air by heating it as it passes through. These types of heat pumps are often more effective in cooler areas, but because they require more energy to actually generate heat, they’re not typically as energy efficient as models that rely on their ability to get heat only out of the air.

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Heating system rebates up to $3,500 – now through December 31st!

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

Have you taken advantage of the Federal Tax Credit yet?  What are you waiting for?  This is the FINAL MONTH to save thousands of dollars when you replace your old, less efficient home heating system with a new, energy saving, high efficiency heater!  If you replace your natural gas, propane gas or oil heating system with a qualifying system by December 31st the Federal Government is providing a tax credit up to $1,500!*

The year-end incentives don’t stop there!  In addition to the tax credit, manufacturer rebates of up to $1,000 on new heating systems and air conditioning systems are available now through December 31st.  Combine these two incentives and you’re saving up to $2,500 by simply having Carney Plumbing, Heating and Cooling replace your old, less efficient heater and air conditioner with a new, energy saving system.

In addition to the money you’re saving through the rebate offers, modern high efficiency heating and air conditioning systems save hundreds of dollars each year in energy usage and come with FULL 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTIES.
Call us today at 215.346.7160 to schedule your FREE, in-home consultation!  Don’t forget- these rebates are only available until December 31st.

The rebates don’t stop there!  We would like to offer you even more savings!  Carney Plumbing, Heating and Cooling now has a coupon allowing for an instant $400 off of your purchase of a new heater and air conditioner!  Click here for the coupon!

Finally, utility providers such as PECO and PP&L are offering rebates up to $700 for high efficiency furnaces, heat pumps and air conditioners.

Families across Pennsylvania are taking advantage of the Rebate Programs.

As you can see, the savings really add up if you act now, but this opportunity will not last!  Don’t wait until after December 31st to have your new heating system installed, because missing this deadline will cost you savings of up to $3,500!!!  Call Carney today to schedule your FREE in-home consultation and take advantage of these unprecedented incentives before the year is over and these offers expire!

*Consult your tax preparer for personal eligibility concerning tax credit.

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Carney PHC Featured in Intelligencer

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling was recently profiled in The Intelligencer as part of their “Going Green” series that appears each Monday in the print version of the paper as well as on line.

Kevin Carney with a geothermal heat pump days before it was installed in Bucks County.

Kevin Carney with a geothermal heat pump days before it was installed in Bucks County.

The article highlights several of the Federal, State and Utility rebate and credit programs that financially aid homeowners who choose to install “green” energy saving appliances.  In this case Carney was contacted to provide insight on how these rebates have effected the decisions that homeowners are making when replacing heating and air conditioning systems.

A photo of the owner of Carney PHC, Kevin J. Carney, was taken standing next to a geothermal heat pump that was installed in a Bucks County home days after the photo was taken.  This homeowner will enjoy a reduction in their income taxes that will equal 30% of the cost to replace an aging oil heating system with an ultra-efficient geothermal heat pump system that will reduce heating, cooling and hot water costs up to 70%!

Call Lisa at 215.346.7160 to schedule a free consultation regarding geothermal heat pump systems.

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Air Conditioner Rebates

Saturday, July 10th, 2010

From July 12th through July 31st, Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling will be offering an exclusive and instant rebate on air conditioning systems – up to $1,000!.
These rebates are very simple – Carney will deduct up to $1,000 on new air conditioning systems until July 31st.  These Carney rebates can be combined with the PECO Rebates, the PP&L Rebates and the Federal Tax Credit.  They can even be combined with the Carney Coupon for Energy Star rated Heating & Air Conditioning Systems (mention this blog post for combo with the coupon).  These systems are also eligible for 12 months interest free financing!

Modern Air Conditioners reduce energy consumption up to 25%.

Modern Air Conditioners reduce energy consumption up to 25%.

In total, select systems combine for up to $3,350 in rebates and credits from Carney, PECO or PP&L and the Federal government’s tax credit program!
Best of all – these systems brand new, state of the art high efficiency systems designed to also save you money on your heating and cooling costs for years to come – in most cases, up to 25%!  They also come with a full 10 year parts and labor warranty.

Call Lisa today at 215.346.7160 to schedule a free estimate that will save up to $3,350 on a new energy saving heating & air conditioning system.

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Heat Pump Replacement, Perkasie Bucks County

Friday, June 11th, 2010

Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling recently completed another heat pump replacement in Bucks County, PA!

A new heat pump system in Perkasie, Bucks County PA.

A new heat pump system in Perkasie, Bucks County PA.

The existing heat pump system in Perkasie had surpassed its useful lifespan.  Although it still functioned – it was costing the homeowners more to operate than it should have.
A Carney installation team installed a new high efficiency heat pump system that qualified for the Federal Tax Credit.  Because the new heat pump is so energy efficient, it also provided PP&L rebates for new heat pump systems.  These homeowners received nearly $3,000 in rebates and credits after installation and will see a reduction in heating and cooling expenses of at least 25%!
Call Carney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling today at 215.346.7160 to see how you can benefit from the current rebates and tax credits that are still available for a limited time.

The comments below are feedback that this particular homeowner provided following this heat pump replacement.  As always, customer commentary is shared on our testimonials page.

Heat Pump Replacement, Perkasie PA

New system seems to be working fine and with yesterday’s 90s, nice. Am sure I’ll be playing with around with the options, adjusting functions etc. for awhile. Thanks for the info and sales help.

Also wanted to comment on Tuesday’s install. Chris and Matt did an outstanding job. What I’ve seen from the work Carney’s did at my in-laws former home and Tuesday’s install were field technicians who are meticulous, thorough, and have great attitudes. Too often you get service for whatever, you’re dealing with techs who seem to be just going through the motions, doing the jobs because the boss told them to. Nothing exceptional. The Carney staff treat you like its their own business at stake, want you totally satisfied and, to come back for more. I will definitely recommend Carney to others.  Thanks, John.

– John B, Perkasie, PA

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